Avoid Sharks

The rule of thumb is that the further south you go the bigger the risk is for stumbling upon a shark in the surf. But still the odds are pretty low. In comparison more people are dying from a bee-sting or a lightening strike than by shark attacks.

12 Tips to Avoid the Teeth of a Shark:

  1. Stay close together in the line-up as sharks often attacks lone individuals
  2. Don’t surf at night, at dusk or at dawn as this is the time when the sharks are most active.
  3. Don’t surf if you have bleeding wounds, and if you cut yourself alert other surfers and leave the water.
  4. Don’t wear any bling on your board or your clothes as the sharks might confuse it with fish scales.
  5. If there is sewage in the water it can attract sharks.
  6. If there is a lot of fish, there might be sharks as well. Avoid spots with diving birds or other signs of huge amounts of fish.
  7. If you see a shark, don’t surf. Not even after waiting a beer or two on the beach.
  8. Don’t wear bright colors as this attracts the sharks. So leave your pink surfboard and wetsuit at home.
  9. When sitting in the line-up try not to splash around too much as this attracts sharks. Also don’t paddle for position too often – rather go for longer paddles fewer times.
  10. Pets in the water attract sharks. Get them out of the water or don’t surf.
  11. If you see a shark don’t try to clap it – get the hell out of the water.
  12. If you do get attacked by a shark don’t hesitate to fight back. Hit it, kick it and yell at it, many different things can scare off a shark and people can survive a shark attack because of resistance. Try to hit the eyes and the gills (not the nose).

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